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WAYS Zero Tolerance: No speaking to Officials. Period.

 

WAYS Strongly adheres to the BAYS Zero Tolerance rule that prohibits talking to the referees. WAYS sees two main issues:

  1. First and foremost, most of our referees are young kids in middle school and high school. Being a referee can be very intimidating. Overzealous coaches, parents and players have on many occasions led to young Wayland referees quitting, never to ref again.
     
  2. Second, in Wayland we prioritize good sportsmanship. In our view yelling at a referee is not good sportsmanship. We encourage our coaches and through them, our kids, to worry about what they can control – their own play. Soccer is a game of mistakes. Referees are no exception. They can only call what they see. And what they see is subject to their knowledge and interpretation of the rules.

Anyone who violates the zero tolerance rule will be disciplined up to and including, in the case of coaches, the possibility of dismissal.

Zero Tolerance Rule, in summary:

All individuals responsible for a team and all spectators shall support the referee. Failure to do so will undermine the referee’s authority and has the potential of creating a hostile environment for the players, the referee, and all the other participants and spectators.
 
  1. No one, except the players, is to speak to the referee during or after the game. Exceptions: Coaches may ask questions before the game, call for substitutions and point out emergencies during the game, or respond to the referee if addressed.
     
  2. Absolutely no disputing calls, during or after the game, no remarks to the referee to watch certain players or attend to rough play. NO YELLING at the referee, EVER, and no criticism, sarcasm, harassment, intimidation, or feedback of any kind during or after the game.
     
  3. Violators may be ejected and are subject to disciplinary action by the BAYS Sportsmanship Review Committee.
     
  4. If coaches or spectators have questions regarding particular calls, rules, or a referee, or wish to give feedback regarding a referee, contact the town soccer club referee’s coordinator for the game in question, or contact the BAYS Referees Representative at https://www.bays.org.

Important note about NOT speaking to opposing players & coaches...

WAYS expects the same conduct toward officials be extended to opposing players. This means:
 
  1. Spectator are NOT to address opposing players or coaches, or to engage in dialog with a players during a game. Any comments should be directed to the WAYS coach after the game.
     
  2. Coaches are NOT to address opposing players, but should direct any concerns, questions, or dialog about an opposing player to that player's coach. If the nature of the concern is an immediate safety issues, the coach should address the game Official, BUT only in the context of safety.
     
  3. EXCEPTION: WAYS coaches SHOULD remain aware of any inappropriate language or action directed at young officials by opposing players/coaches. In such instances, WAYS does support a coach addressing the opposing coach politely, to remind him/her of BAYS policy, and in the interests of protecting a young official from harmful remarks or actions.
Remember! These are our children and our neighbors, and we must be responsible, example-setting adults in this youth sport setting at all times. It is far too easy to get "caught up in the moment" during a game. Remember that we do this for the kids! Please do your part to make WAYS soccer a safe and positive experience for our young participants. Seek assistance from your respective WAYS Commissioner, The Director or Officials, or WAYS president as needed during the season. 

 

 Current BAYS Zero Tolerance Policy  
 

It is expected that every person responsible for a team and each and every spectator and player will support the referee. This support is essential to the proper play of the game and to the development of our players. Failure to support the referees, especially by the person (s) responsible for the team,
  • undermines the authority of the referee,
  • sets a bad example for everyone else, especially the players, and
  • can rapidly lead into a hostile, negative game environment which is entirely inconsistent with the sportsmanship goals BAYS is trying to promote.
Therefore, the basic rule is that persons responsible for a team and spectators will not address the referee at all during the play of the game. This prohibition, its exceptions, and the penalties for violating it, are described below.

Persons Responsible for a Team

  1. With the exceptions of responding to a communication initiated by the referee, making a substitution, or pointing out an emergency safety issue, during the play of the game the persons responsible for the team should not say anything to the referee, nor should they do anything which in any way conveys any criticism of the referee.
     
  2. Coaches may ask questions before the start of the game.
     
  3. Coaches may not approach the referee at half time or at the end of the game.
     
  4. Coaches who have concerns about a referee’s officiating may express those concerns orally or in writing to the referee assignor and/or the BAYS Referees Representative. They may not express those concerns directly to the referee.

BAYS recommends that the referee deal with infractions of this rule in the following manner:
 
  1. As to the first infraction, the referee should determine if the conduct involves serious misconduct under the ordinary FIFA rules. If it does, a caution (optionally showing a yellow card) or a dismissal (optionally showing a red card) should be awarded, depending on the nature of the conduct. (For example, a threat of bodily harm or an obscenity directed at the referee should result in a dismissal. A prolonged, significant outburst of dissent should result in a caution.)
     
  2. On the other hand, the first instance of a short, reasonably low-keyed referee criticism by a person responsible for the team should be ignored. The second instance should result in a warning, the third in a caution, and the fourth in an ejection. In giving the warning, the referee should make clear the next instance of dissent of any sort will result in a caution. Similarly, after a caution, the referee should make clear that the next instance of dissent of any kind will result in an ejection.

Spectators

With the exception of responding to a communication initiated by the referee or pointing out an emergency safety issue, spectators should not say anything to the referee, nor should they do anything which in any way conveys any criticism of the referee.

BAYS recommends that the referee deal with infractions of this rule in the following manner:
 
  1. As to the first infraction, the referee should stop the game and ask the person responsible for the team to quiet the offending spectator.
     
  2. As to the second infraction, the referee should stop the game and ask the person responsible for the team to warn the spectator that the next infraction will result in the spectator leaving the game; otherwise the referee will abandon the game, and file a report with the club and BAYS. BAYS policy will be to generally impose a forfeit on the team with which the spectator is affiliated, and the referee should so inform the person responsible for that team.
     
  3. As to the third infraction, the referee should instruct the person responsible for the team to direct the spectator to leave the field. If the spectator does not leave, the referee should abandon the game, and file his/her report.
The referee may need the assistance of the responsible persons from both teams if the spectator is not affiliated with either team.

 Link to BAYS source page



updated 9/3/13